He had been the victim of two separate brutal assaults.
He had been the victim of two separate brutal assaults.

Vicious assaults led the victim to increased drug use

A TOOWOOMBA man has blamed brutal assaults on him for increasing his drug use which saw him become a heavy user of cannabis.

The Chronicle's court reports of the assaults on Brian William Fisher and a judge's sentencing remarks of the perpetrators were used in Toowoomba Magistrates Court to verify the attacks.

The first assault involved a brutal beating over three hours by three housemates, two of whom were jailed for their respective roles, when Fisher was about 24 years of age, the court heard.

The second, three years ago, involved Fisher being king hit and left with a broken jaw at Tattersalls Hotel for which the assailant was jailed.

Solicitor Joe McConnell, of MacDonald Law, told the court his client had two titanium plates inserted in his face as a result of that assault and he still suffered headaches today.

That had led to his client increasing his use of cannabis as self medication, he said.

Police prosecutor Al Windsor told the court a police search of the now 36-year-old's East Toowoomba home on August 6 had found 112g of cannabis in three clip seal plastic bags, a box of 26 oxycodone tablets, electric scales for weighing the drug and $605 cash which police suspected as being proceeds of drug sales.

Sergeant Windsor said Fisher had told police the money had been savings from his Centrelink payments but when he couldn't legitimise the funds police charged him with possessing proceeds of crime.

Fisher admitted having given a friend half-an-ounce (or 14g) of cannabis in July which was the basis of a supply charge, and by repackaging some of the drug he had been charged with production.

He pleaded guilty to producing, supplying and possessing a dangerous drug, possessing drug related utensils and possessing proceeds of a drug offence.

Mr McConnell said it was accepted his client had four pages of criminal history but that he had completed a nine-month probation order in the past.

His client was the carer for a deceased friend's mother as well as for a teenage stepchild and that he was disappointed in himself for letting people down with his drug use.

His client had done two diplomas in business and management and had seen his GP and getting help to get away from drugs.

Magistrate Graham Lee told Fisher to stay on the right track.

"You've got two diplomas, you should utilise that rather than breaking the law," he said.

Mr Lee placed Fisher on two years probation to include random testing for illicit drug use.