NSW Police Minister David Elliott, NSW Marine Rescue Commissioner Stacey Tannos ESM and local Member for Tweed Heads Geoff Provest
NSW Police Minister David Elliott, NSW Marine Rescue Commissioner Stacey Tannos ESM and local Member for Tweed Heads Geoff Provest Scott Powick

The new $200,000 vehicle you'll see rolling around the Tweed

BOATIES on the Tweed should feel safer after the State Government handed over a $200,000 van to support major rescues in NSW.

The mobile incident vehicle was handed over to Marine Rescue Point Danger to provide communication and control during major rescue operation.

 

Police and Emergency Services Minister David Elliott and Tweed MP Geoff Provest joined Marine Rescue NSW Commissioner Stacey Tannos to officially hand over the new vehicle this morning, which will be used across all of Marine Rescue NSW.

Mr Elliott said the State Government was proud to support Marine Rescue NSW volunteers with additional funding for upgraded resources to assist in their vital work and save lives on the water.

"Over the next four years, Marine Rescue NSW will receive an additional $37.6 million in funding to deliver 38 new boats, provide new and upgraded operations bases and other facilities and reinforce the marine radio network," Mr Elliott said.

 

NSW Police Minister David Elliott, NSW Marine Rescue Commissioner Stacey Tannos ESM and local Member for Tweed Heads Geoff Provest
NSW Police Minister David Elliott, NSW Marine Rescue Commissioner Stacey Tannos and Tweed MP Geoff Provest with the new $200,000 mobile incident vehicle. Scott Powick

Mr Provest said the modified Iveco Daily van would be used to provide critical command and control during major response operations and serve as a back-up communications system.

"This vehicle replaces a 26-year-old communications truck and will be an invaluable resource during extended and remote response operations," Mr Provest said.

Marine Rescue Point Danger Unit Commander Glenda Ashby told the Tweed Daily News the new vehicle would be a crucial tool during emergencies on the water.

"It's fantastic and certainly going to help if a base is under renovation or anything like that as it has backup radios and communications, if there's a critical incident and they need communications at hand this will be a really good tool," she said.

Ms Ashby said the new van could hold two radio operators and was similar to the Point Danger control room, meaning it could keep track of vessels on the water.

The Marine Rescue Point Danger headquarters is set to be re-developed in the coming months, with the unit moving temporarily to a rescue base at Duranbah.

Ms Ashby said despite the relocation, Marine Rescue would be operating as per usual.

"Well be setting up a radio communications base down there, we will have to rely on cameras which is unfortunate as we won't have sight of the bar," she said.

"We need to get out to all the boaters that we will continue to monitor their calls and have them log on and off with us, we aren't going anywhere."