Brad Goldpaint’s photo won him astrophotographer of the year. Picture: Supplied

Incredible views of space revealed in competition entries

24th October 2018 6:16 PM

THE STARS of astrophotography tell a truly impressive story of the cosmos.

The Royal Observatory Greenwich has released its selection of this year's best photos of the night sky after thousands of professional and amateur snappers fought for the $18,000 top prize and the title of Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year.

 

A lone photographer stands beneath the Andromeda Galaxy and the milky way in Utah — the winning photograph taken by Brad Goldpaint. Picture: Supplied
A lone photographer stands beneath the Andromeda Galaxy and the milky way in Utah — the winning photograph taken by Brad Goldpaint. Picture: Supplied

 

The Corona Australis Dust Complex captured by Italian photographer Mario Cogo. Picture: Supplied
The Corona Australis Dust Complex captured by Italian photographer Mario Cogo. Picture: Supplied

The 2018 nod has gone to American photographer Brad Goldpaint, who captivated the London judges with his awe-inspiring photo of a man standing under the milky way on the edge of a cliff, overlooking a vast rock formation in eastern Utah.

"This superb image is emblematic of everything it means to be an astrophotographer; the balance between light and dark, the contrasting textures and tones of land and sky and the photographer alone under a starry canopy of breathtaking scale and beauty," judge Will Gater said.

 

This photo from Hungarian photographer László Francsics captures a morning crescent moon over Budapest. Picture: Supplied
This photo from Hungarian photographer László Francsics captures a morning crescent moon over Budapest. Picture: Supplied

 

 

The runner up photo of the dark Namibian sky was the perfect location to capture the wonder of the Witch Head Nebula and Rigel. Picture: Supplied
The runner up photo of the dark Namibian sky was the perfect location to capture the wonder of the Witch Head Nebula and Rigel. Picture: Supplied

 

The award has also showcased photos of the breathtaking aurora borealis captured above a fjord in Norway's Lofoten archipelago, August's total solar eclipse, the remarkable parade of planets in our solar system as seen from a backyard and the faint gas cloud known as Witch Head Nebula.

 

The prize for best newcomer went to this photo of the Milky Way in China. Picture: Supplied
The prize for best newcomer went to this photo of the Milky Way in China. Picture: Supplied

 

Italian photographer, 15-year-old Fabian Dalpiaz claimed the prize for Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year for his incredible photo of a meteor passing over the magnificent landscape of the Alpe di Siusi.

Australian Peter Ward was also awarded runner up for his picture of the total solar eclipse over Wyoming in the US in August. Picture: Supplied.

 

Fabian Dalpiaz won young photographer of the year for this photo of the moon shining over the stunning landscape of the Alpe di Siusi in Italy. Picture: Supplied
Fabian Dalpiaz won young photographer of the year for this photo of the moon shining over the stunning landscape of the Alpe di Siusi in Italy. Picture: Supplied

 

Australian Peter Ward was awarded runner up for his picture of the total solar eclipse over Wyoming, USA in August. Picture: Supplied.
Australian Peter Ward was awarded runner up for his picture of the total solar eclipse over Wyoming, USA in August. Picture: Supplied.

 

 

 

A breathtaking aurora borealis above the fjord in the gorgeous Lofoten archipelago, in Northern Norway — captured by Denmark’s Mikkel Beiter. Picture: Supplied
A breathtaking aurora borealis above the fjord in the gorgeous Lofoten archipelago, in Northern Norway — captured by Denmark’s Mikkel Beiter. Picture: Supplied

 

Royal Museums Greenwich curator Dr Melanie Vandenbrouck said choosing a winner was "fiendishly difficult."

The competition received over 4200 entries from 91 countries - the best photos are set to be showcased in an exhibit at London's National Maritime Museum.

"Their mesmerising, often astonishing photographs, show us the exquisite complexity of space, and movingly convey our place in the universe," she said.

The competition will run again in 2019, for more information visit www.rmg.co.uk/astrophoto