TOO LOUD: Tweed residents are sick of continuous noise from the Pacific Highway and want sound barriers put in place.
TOO LOUD: Tweed residents are sick of continuous noise from the Pacific Highway and want sound barriers put in place. Scott Powick

Residents' quality of life affected by traffic noise

TWEED residents living near the Pacific Highway are tired of the constant sound of traffic.

Resident Russell Huddy said since the highway opened, his neighbourhood off Kennedy Dr had been forced to put up with a constant hum of traffic noise at all hours of the day and night.

"There's no soundproofing from the southern approach of the Tweed River to the bypass over Kennedy Dr," Mr Huddy said.

"We've got nothing. The bridge has no balustrade either, so the sound is spinning down and hitting the water."

Living closer to the highway, resident John White said he was concerned about the impact the noise was having on the quality of life of his neighbours.

"Directly behind us is an old pensioner who couldn't hear her TV of a night even when it's on full volume because of the trucks," he said.

"I bought her one of those Bluetooth headphone sets so she could hear her own TV inside her own house."

Mr Huddy said he'd spent years trying to get the government to listen to his concerns.

"Correspondence with (the government) started 12years ago," he said.

"We feel as if we've got an asset here worth money and it's being eroded by something that could be easily fixed.

"Nobody is going to buy a house with road noise."

Labor candidate for Tweed, Craig Elliot, said he would try to get the government to listen and install appropriate sound barriers.

"They're asking the government to give consideration to putting up a pop-up sound barrier that's effective, because a dirt mound isn't cutting it," he said.

"This noise is starting to adversely affect their quality of life, but also the way they conduct their home.

"There's plenty of money in Sydney for roadworks, it's time some of that money comes up to Tweed."