SUPPORTING COMMUNITY: Cody Art, Daniel Ross, Mike Ashburn, Alyce Yogo, Nathan Roughead, Raven Tuala and Simon Tate at Les Burger Field ready for today’s Charity Cup. Photo: Scott Powick
SUPPORTING COMMUNITY: Cody Art, Daniel Ross, Mike Ashburn, Alyce Yogo, Nathan Roughead, Raven Tuala and Simon Tate at Les Burger Field ready for today’s Charity Cup. Photo: Scott Powick

Rain can’t dampen charity cup fever

A CHARITY event for a mate eight years ago has snowballed into a major feature on the touch football calendar.

Charity Cup organiser Simon Tate's fellow touch teammate Clint "Tommy" Porter woke up one morning and couldn't move his legs.

A non-cancerous tumour on his spine had essentially paralysed him from the waist down and Clint was told he would never walk again.

The first Charity Cup was to help Clint and his family with the shock diagnosis and rehabilitation.

Thankfully, after surgery and rehabilitation, Clint is back on his feet and doing things doctors originally didn't think possible.

 

SUPPORTING COMMUNITY: Cody Art, Daniel Ross, Mike Ashburn, Alyce Yogo, Nathan Roughead, Raven Tuala and Simon Tate at Les Burger Field ready for today’s Charity Cup. Photo: Scott Powick
SUPPORTING COMMUNITY: Cody Art, Daniel Ross, Mike Ashburn, Alyce Yogo, Nathan Roughead, Raven Tuala and Simon Tate at Les Burger Field ready for today’s Charity Cup. Photo: Scott Powick

 

The success of the first cup birthed the annual event- the proceeds going on to support more community members in need.

Mr Tate said people helped in the past included one-punch victim Sam Ford.

"One lady we helped, her husband committed suicide and the money went to things like rent to support her," he said.

"Anyone who comes down during the day and who knows of someone who is worthy or help, let one of us know."

The event will be held at Les Burger Field today, weather permitting, and will kick off with a welcome to country at 8am. The mixed teams round robin will begin at 8.30am and if weather permits be accompanied by market stalls.

Supporter shirts available on the day have been based on a design by Kingscliff ­indigenous artist Marni Tuala, keeping with this year's theme to honour first nations people.

The Moorung Moobar Goodjinburra woman of the Bundjalung nation explained the artwork was based around the local environment, including the red earth, mountains to the west and oceans to the east, and represented "our community and what makes us who we are".

"In our language there is no word for just 'community', it is the same word for 'family' - jimbalung," Ms Tuala said.

Mr Tate said last year the day raised $65,000.

The money also went to putting 73 people through nationally recognised mental health training, including mental health first aid, youth mental health and another directed and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health.

"We want to show people there is strength in numbers - the more people who are aware of signs and symptoms that lead to poor mental health, the more people we can help out," Mr Tate said.

"I'm not sure of the stats in our area but everyone knows some family who has had to deal with terrible circumstances."