Cr Warren Polglase, Tweed MP Geoff Provest, Cr James Owen, NSW  Minister for Regional Water Niall Blair and TSC water senior projects  manager Robert Siebert are planning on improving Tweed's water security.
Cr Warren Polglase, Tweed MP Geoff Provest, Cr James Owen, NSW Minister for Regional Water Niall Blair and TSC water senior projects manager Robert Siebert are planning on improving Tweed's water security. Aisling Brennan

Queensland is key to securing Tweed's water security

A POTENTIAL pipeline connecting Tweed to a secure water supply in Southeast Queensland could be the solution to improve the shire's water security.

NSW Minister for Regional Water Niall Blair announced yesterday the government would provide $95,000 for a study to investigate the viability of a pipeline from Southeast Queensland to the Tweed in an effort to secure more water into the future.

Tweed Shire's water supply was put under pressure last year when Bray Park Weir was inundated with salt water, causing thousands of homes to go without a clean water supply for days until the problem was solved.

Mr Blair said negotiations with Seqwater, Gold Coast Water and the NSW and Queensland governments had already begun.

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"This is about making sure the Tweed has a secure and a safe water supply as a back-up,” Mr Blair said.

"Currently Tweed relies on a single system for water supply, which is at risk of salt-water intrusion in the future.

"We know they've had to deal with saltwater inundation and being able to tap into what's happening on the other side of the border provides another level of security and a back-up for the system here in the Tweed.”

Tweed MP Geoff Provest said connecting to Queensland water supply would act as "an insurance policy” if there was another "catastrophic failure” like saltwater inundation or an infrastructure malfunction occurred.

Councillor Warren Polgase said the funding would enhance the council's ongoing study into water security.

"What we'll be able to do is hook into the supply in Queensland in case of an emergency or our plant breaks down,” he said.

"The water supply in Southeast Queensland starts all the way up in Mooloolaba and comes all the way down to the Tugun plant. If we have issues with our plant, we'll be able to hook into their systems straight away.”

The study comes as the council continues work on raising Clarrie Hall Dam.

The council has invited expressions of interest for an independent consultant to prepare the environmental impact statement for the proposed project to raise the wall of Clarrie Hall Dam.

Expressions close at 4pm on Wednesday, October 17.

It will take up to two years to complete the environmental impact statement before it goes on public exhibition in early 2020.

For more information, visit www.yoursaytweed.com.au/ClarrieHallDam.