Kingscliff Chamber of Commerce president James Owen and LJ Hooker Kingscliff owner Paul McMahon are confident the 2020 Country Surf Life Saving Championships will bring money into town. PHOTO: SCOTT POWICK
Kingscliff Chamber of Commerce president James Owen and LJ Hooker Kingscliff owner Paul McMahon are confident the 2020 Country Surf Life Saving Championships will bring money into town. PHOTO: SCOTT POWICK

Major sporting event pain point for some businesses

SHORT term pain may have a long term gain for Kingscliff businesses when it comes to hosting major sporting events.

Hundreds of competitors will visit the Tweed for the 2020 Country Surf Life Saving Championships this weekend, which has drawn a mixed reaction from the business community.

LJ Hooker Kingscliff owner Paul McMahon said the family-friendly event boosted the town's economy, not only through accommodation, but by supporting businesses.

Mr McMahon said it was events like the Championships and visitors to the Tweed that kept locals employed.

"These sort of events always create a benefit to the local economy," Mr McMahon said.

"Each person who spends a day here spends on average $170 a day.

"That money goes to cafes, accommodation providers, cleaners, shops, the local newsagents and service stations.

"It's a family event about sport, which is a good healthy fun, and it's a big part of what the Tweed is about."

Kingscliff Chamber of Commerce president James Owen said the event provided an opportunity to "show off" Kingscliff's beaches which was a major drawcard for tourists.

Mr Owen said coverage of the Championships strengthened Tweed tourism and he welcomed the idea of more family-friendly events to the town.

"The Country Champs is a great event which brings hundreds of competitors to town every year which is really good for our accommodation providers," Mr Owen said.

"The organisation has been working hard with Kingscliff businesses to help maximise the potential of having all those people in town.

"It's also another opportunity to show off our fantastic beaches … by posting photos on social media and media coverage of the event."

But Watersports Guru owner Tim Jack Adams said while sporting events such as the Championships and Kingscliff Triathlon brought an influx of visitors to town, his business experienced a downturn during these events.

Mr Adams said competitors were focused on the event and either weren't interested in a paddle or had their own boards.

However, he said despite experiencing a loss during such events, local businesses had to focus on the long-term effect.

"Anything that gets people to reconnect to nature and creates positive human connection, I'm all for it," Mr Adams said.

"I think it's wonderful, and as local operators, we have to be aware we might lose some weekends.

"The Kingy Tri is like this too, but the thing is, the amount of exposure it brings to Kingscliff is amazing.

"They (competitors) might not hire anything that weekend, but they might come back another time and we might not have gotten that exposure had we not had that event."