Motorists in Tweed Heads were caught by surprise when torrential rain flooded parts of Wharf Street near the Tweed Heads Civic Centre in what local described as the heaviest rain seen in many years. Picture: Scott Powick.
Motorists in Tweed Heads were caught by surprise when torrential rain flooded parts of Wharf Street near the Tweed Heads Civic Centre in what local described as the heaviest rain seen in many years. Picture: Scott Powick.

Flash flooding turned Tweed streets into canals

YOU would never have guessed the Tweed was on water restrictions just last week.

More than 660mm of rain has poured down on Tweed Heads in the past seven days, filling Clarrie Hall dam and lifting water restrictions.

From dry earth to lost crops farmers across the Tweed can't seem to catch a break - and forecasters say there's more rain to come.

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster David Wilke said 156mm of rain drenched the Tweed overnight and a further 67mm fell since 9am today.

Mr Wilke said rainfall would persist for the next week with heavy bursts forecast early Thursday morning.

"It will ease from time to time, but there's a chance of rainfall most days for the next week," Mr Wilke said.

"Totals for tomorrow you're looking at between 50mm and over 100mm of rain in some places.

"As we head into Friday and Saturday, there will be a little less rain, then it will pick up again on Sunday."

 

Recreation Street in Tweed Heads was turned into a canal this morning when the town was drenched in one of the heaviest downpours recorded in many years. Residents were left to watch or try and frantically move their vehicles as the deluge overwhelmed storm drains and street gutters
Recreation Street in Tweed Heads was turned into a canal this morning when the town was drenched in one of the heaviest downpours recorded in many years. Residents were left to watch or try and frantically move their vehicles as the deluge overwhelmed storm drains and street gutters

 

Mr Wilke said a cyclone over the Coral Sea would not cause more rainfall but would likely bring strong winds and hazardous surf.

Marine Rescue NSW Point Danger unit commander Glenda Ashby said visual of the Tweed River Bar was horrendous.

Ms Ashby said "half a tree" was reported floating down the Tweed River and urged boaters to stay out of the water until conditions improved.

"We ask if people can put off a trip in their vessels while the bad weather is around because it's volunteers and emergency service workers who put their lives on the line if someone needs help."

Some flights in and out of the Gold Coast Airport were affected from the heavy downpour.

Gold Coast Airport chief operating officer Marion Charlton said flights for Sydney and Melbourne were delayed earlier this morning.

"We encourage our passengers to check their flight status with their airlines."