GOLD STAR: After winning a national hockey title playing for Queensland last week, 13-year-old Bailey Charlesworth is back to school at Kingscliff High.
GOLD STAR: After winning a national hockey title playing for Queensland last week, 13-year-old Bailey Charlesworth is back to school at Kingscliff High. Scott Davis

Could Wotherspoon clone be our next hockey star?

Although Dylan Wotherspoon is sitting pretty at the top having just won Commonwealth Games gold, he might one day be looking over his shoulder at the Tweed prodigy he is helping to shape as the Kookaburras' next star striker.

That young gun is 13-year-old Kingscliff High School student Bailey Charlesworth, who has knocked up another huge goal tally at the Under 15 Australian Hockey Championships.

Young gun Bailey Charlesworth was scoring goals for fun at nationals.
Young gun Bailey Charlesworth was scoring goals for fun at nationals. Click in Focus

Bailey, who was the leading goal scorer at last year's Under 13 nationals in Perth with 13 goals before scoring a whopping 27 at state championships, bagged six goals at this year's national tournament to finish equal second on the scoring tally.

Bailey watched every match of the Commonwealth Games where Murwillumbah's Wotherspoon won gold with the Kookaburras and Tweed prodigies Savannah Fitzpatrick and Gabrielle Nance won silver with the Hockeyroos.

Naturally, Bailey paid a lot of attention to Wotherspoon. They may be poles apart in age and experience but, when both strikers are on their game, they score goals for fun. He has also trained with Wotherspoon and Fitzpatrick, who gave him first-hand evidence that you can't get to the top of any sport without putting in the hard yards.

The next best thing to hard work in a young sporting career is a little bit of support and, lucky for Bailey, he has just picked up a Mazon Hockey sponsorship, supplying the youngster with all his equipment.

With his kit sorted, Bailey has more time to focus on his schooling at Kingscliff High amid a hectic training schedule that involved three to four training sessions and two matches a week in the lead-up to nationals.

His family could not be prouder of Bailey and his brother Beau, who recently made shadow in the Queensland side and is playing for Labrador in the under-17's.

With more hard workand support they should continue the Tweed tradition of a town punching above its weight on the hockey field.