Clarrie Hall Dam has recently fallen below full capacity but Tweed Shire Council says water restrictions will not be put in place.
Clarrie Hall Dam has recently fallen below full capacity but Tweed Shire Council says water restrictions will not be put in place. Contributed

Clarrie Hall Dam dips below full capacity

CLARRIE Hall Dam has recently dipped below 100 per cent capacity as Northern Rivers councils are urging residents to be frugal with their water use.

But Tweed Shire Council will not be imposing water restrictions on residents any time soon.

With the entire state now gripped in one of the worst droughts on record, Tweed's receding water supply could continue with below average rain fall predicted for the coming months.

 

Photographer, Lisa Alexander's property, 90kms south west of Blackall in in drought with no relief in sight.
For farmers in drought, there is no relief in sight. Lisa Alexander

However Tweed Shire Council water manager Michael Wraight told ABC North Coast this morning that the Tweed was well positioned to weather the drought.

"Our dam levels just fell below 100 per cent, but we still have a relatively healthy dam supply at the moment," Mr Wraight said.

Mr Wraight said council is looking at increasing the size of Clarrie Hall Dam to fortify Tweed's supply.

 

The sun sets over Crams Farm on the banks of Clarrie Hall Dam in the Tweed Valley.
Crams Farm on the banks of Clarrie Hall Dam. Ryan Fowler (no re-use)

"We're in a process at the moment of preparing water supply augmentation", Mr Wraight said.

"Our preferred strategy is looking at increasing the size of Clarrie Hall Dam.

Mr Wraight said although Tweed would not be hit with any imminent water restrictions, he urged residents to be mindful and conservative with their water use.

"In terms of water restrictions, we're not at a position now or getting towards a position where we'd be imposing any restrictions on people," he said.

"But we are always encouraging people to conserve their water."      

Meanwhile, Keith Williams, Chair of Rous County Council, the regional water supply authority providing potable water in bulk to many council areas in the Northern Rivers, told ABC North Coast that it could take months to see the effects of drought on water supply levels.

Mr Williams said although the Rocky Creek dam was looking "really good" at 96 per cent, the community needs to start conserving water now.

"We shouldn't be waiting until we've hit 60 per cent dam levels before we start thinking about not wasting water," Mr Williams said.

"Things like what plants we put in the garden, are we using hoses outside, and just being careful and mindful that the longer we keep that dam level up, the longer we go without restrictions."