ROLE MODEL: Tweed Council Mayor Katie Milne has called on political leaders in the region to rise up against bullying.
ROLE MODEL: Tweed Council Mayor Katie Milne has called on political leaders in the region to rise up against bullying. SCOTT POWICK

Can't we all just get along?

A CALL has been made for community leaders to be bastions of politeness, in the middle of one of Tweed's most fierce political seasons.

Tweed Mayor Katie Milne has called on her political counterparts to end the nasty comments and be leaders against vitriolic sledging in the community.

"The Tweed hospital and the state election saw online bullying in our politics rise to an all-time high,” Cr Milne said.

"The intensity of the vitriol has been truly shocking.

"As politicians we can set an example by ending negative political campaigning.”

Cr Milne told The Tweed Daily News that bullying was "a sickness” which should not be condoned.

She said there were people in the community who had gone over the top with comments made in public or online, and that they should consider seeking help.

"We all struggle with anger but those who go overboard really need to consider getting help.”

"There are free anger management courses available in the area.”

With the federal election being called for May 18 and tensions from the Cudgen Plateau debate still lingering, the Tweed mayor said it was time for political leaders and hopefuls to set an example for the region.

"Negative campaigning sends a terrible message to the community that our leaders endorse bad mouthing others.”

"It's so ugly to see it in our media and plastered all around our streets on posters.

"Let's all make a supreme effort to support each other in the face of bullying even, and especially, if it comes from those on our own side of the debate.”