BOATING BLITZ: Leon McKenzie, Darren Hulm, Anthony Alback and Peter Miller will join forces this Australia Day long weekend to ensure boaties stay safe on Tweed waterways. Picture: Jodie Callcott.
BOATING BLITZ: Leon McKenzie, Darren Hulm, Anthony Alback and Peter Miller will join forces this Australia Day long weekend to ensure boaties stay safe on Tweed waterways. Picture: Jodie Callcott.

Boaties targeted in Tweed blitz

CROSS border rivalries will be put aside this Australia Day long weekend when both NSW and Queensland boating authorities take to Tweed waterways to ensure boaties stay safe.

The joint operation is a first for NSW Maritime and Maritime Safety Queensland who will be patrolling together with NSW police during one of the busiest weekends on the waterways.

NSW Maritime acting executive director Alex Barrell said it made sense both states worked collaboratively because boaties from each state regularly crossed the border.

Mr Barrell said about 72 per cent of boaties on the Tweed River were from Queensland and laws in each state varied.

"The Australia Day long weekend is traditionally a busy time for boating," Mr Barrell said.

"We want boaters to have a level of confidence in their knowledge of the rules that apply in NSW waters.

"If you are operating a vessel in waters of your primary place of residence, the vessel must be registered in that state and you must comply with the applicable safety equipment requirements.

"If you then cross the border you will also be compliant in that state.

"Ultimately, we want everyone to be able to head out for a day on the water and have a great time - regardless of whether it is a stand up paddle board, kayak, motor boat, yacht or jetski."

Maritime Safety Queensland general manager Angus Mitchell said by working together boating safety officers would share databases and differences in the law.

"General safety is the same whether you're in NSW or Queensland, but we're starting to see far more co-operation between NSW Maritime and Maritime Safety Queensland," Mr Mitchell said.

"We are only authorised in our respective states, but if we're working together, then we can support each other and not only rely on the state you're in.

"If we are there side-by-side, we can reach into each other's database instantaneously, and if you've got a licence from one state to another, then you've got a little bit more authority."